Posted on

Why Mortgage Rates Are Going Up

Mortgage rates this week. At the current 15-year fixed rate, you’ll pay $745.21 each month for every $100,000 you borrow, down from $747.23 last week. At the current 5/1 ARM rate, you’ll pay $484.36 each month for every $100,000 you borrow, down from $487.27 last week.

Why Do Mortgage Rates Go Up and Down? January 30th, 2019 | Interest Rates. Mortgage interest rates fluctuate from week to week and they can make huge swings from decade to decade. In the early 1980s, for example, mortgage rates were as high as 18% while roughly 30 years later they are less than a third of that rate.

Treasury Bonds affect mortgage rates More Than Any Other Bond. Mortgages are higher risk than most bonds. The main reason is that they are longer-term either 15 years or 30 years. The most popular bonds that also have long terms are U.S. Treasurys. They are offered at 10-year, 20-year, and 30-year terms.

The Correlation Between Mortgage Rates & the Stock Market. There is not a tangible relationship between mortgage rates and the stock market whereby one can be said to directly drive the other.

Are Interest Rates Going Up Today With interest rates rising to 0.75% (from 0.5%) in August 2018, the current forecast is for interest rates to not go up again until mid-2020, but much depends on the outcome of Brexit. By 2022 the Bank of England base rate is predicted to have risen to between 1% and 1.25%.

To put that into perspective, the base rate today is 0.75 per cent while back in 2009 it was 0.5 per cent from March onwards.

That means it’s best to shop for a mortgage now, while mortgage rates are still historically low. The average interest rate on a conventional 30-year fixed-rate home loan is 3.81%. That’s down more than a full percentage point from last year.